Monalog Now Has a YouTube Channel!

I am very excited to announce that Monalog now has its own Youtube channel.  We plan on making a number of exciting videos of interest to the black and white analog community, and will also showcase other videos we think you will enjoy.  Check it out at:

https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCgxZqiKMg64qfj9Wmcgbwdw

Michael Marks

 

 

Monalog Collective Photographers Virtual Sharing and Learning Experience – Your Covid-19 Photographic Life, Saturday, April 3, 2021 at 2pm EST

Covid has caused all of us to be creative in ways we have not been before. Because it is not currently possible for Monalog to schedule in-person photographic events, the Collective will be hosting a series of exciting virtual events until we and our fellow black and white analog photographers can get together.

Your Covid-19 Photographic Life is the first of Monalog’s virtual events. This Zoom-based seminar will be an intimate discussion with Monalog Collective members Michael Marks, Paul Margolis and David Haas concerning the photographic challenges they have faced during the Covid-19 pandemic. Monalog Collective member Drew Wagner will host the event. Presentations will include:

  • Member background, type of photography, description of their work, format and materials used
  • Each member’s story of what they have done photographically during the pandemic and how the pandemic has affected their the work and creativity
  • What motivates each member to create during the these difficult times, and what have they done outside of making and printing photographs to “keep their head in the game” and maintain interest in creating and being creative

Total program time will be approximately 60 minutes.

This and future events will take place on Zoom and will be free of charge.

Those who register to attend will receive an email with a link to join the lecture prior to the event start time.

Note: Audio, video, and other information sent during these Zoom sessions may be recorded. By joining this session, you automatically consent to such recordings. If you do not consent to being recorded, you can turn off your video sharing within the application or consider not joining the session.

We look forward to seeing you at these upcoming seminars!

The deadline for sign up is March 27, 2021.

For further information and to reserve your place in this event please contact Michael Marks at: info@monalogcollective.com

Jim Fitzgerald Show, “A Banquet of Light” at the Lightbox Photographic Gallery, March 13- June 5

Monalog member and Large and Ultra Large format photographer, Jim Fitzgerald is proud to announce the opening of “A Banquet of Light.”  The opening will feature Jim’s handmade panoramic carbon transfer book. Images from the book will be also featured on the gallery walls. Additionally there will be 13 8×10 carbon transfer prints hung in the mezzanine balcony area of the gallery. These images feature recent new work, many of which were created during the pandemic.

There will be an online gallery link after the show opens for those who cannot attend or see the show in person. Jim will give a short video presentation explaining the creation of the book and describe the images in the edition.  For more information go to

http://lightbox-photographic.com/shows/a_banquet_of_light_jim_fitzgerald

 

Find us on Facebook!

We crossed the digital divide last week and created the @MonalogCollective Facebook page.  Now you can keep track of news, events and members new work in real time. The Monalog Collective website will remain the destination for in-depth information on our group as well as hosting member bio pages and galleries. So, take a moment to visit the Collective’s home page and click the FB link at the bottom of the page, follow @MonalogCollective’ new page and see what our photographers are up to. One exciting bit of news we just announced is the publication of “Survivors”, Jim Fitzgerald’s handmade, fine press edition book of 8×10 carbon prints depicting Yosemite Nation Park’s black oaks. And keep watch for more new work from our members! https://www.facebook.com/MonalogCollective/

 

Michael Marks Inclusion in the 2020 Photo Review 36th Annual International Photography Competition Exhibition

Michael Marks had one of his photographs selected to be included in the 2020 Photo Review 36th Annual Photography Competition have been posted on the Photo Review website for a virtual exhibition.  You can see them here: https://www.photoreview.org.  The 2020 competition was juried by Kathy Ryan, Photo Editor, and Jessica Dimson, Deputy Director of Photography, of The New York Times Magazine.

Michael Marks Inclusion in the 2020 DaVinci Art Alliance Members Exhibition, Philadelphia, December 2nd – December 20th, 2020

Michael Marks will have one of his photographs, Our American Gothic exhibited at the 2020 Davinci Art Alliance Members Exhibition at the DVAA gallery in Philadelphia and virtually on line at https://davinciartalliance.org/light

There will be a virtual Public Opening Reception on Wednesday, December 2, 7-8pm at https://davinciartalliance.org/calendar/light-opening-reception

Jim Fitzgerald is a Featured Artist at Veritas Editions on Artsy, November 18 – December 22, 2020

Monalogue member and carbon transfer artist Jim Fitzgerald is happy to announce that he is the featured artist at the Veritas Editions site from November 18, 2020 to December 22, 2020 on Artsy.
Several of Jim’s carbon transfer prints are on display in this online gallery including his two hand made carbon transfer fine press edition books. All are available for sale.
Please spend a moment or two to travel into these beautiful prints as you view them. Jim is always available to answer any questions.

Workshops and Tutorials Offered By Monalog Member David Haas

Discover the ease, economy and joy of the silver process.  Individual tutorials and small group workshops are tailored for the beginner or those that want to take their skills to the next level.  Design your own workshop or leave it up to David based on your input.

From pin hole to large format cameras, in the filed, studio, or the darkroom, taught at your pace, on your time, weekdays or weekends. Pricing by the hour or the workshop – your choice!

David can provide room board at a very affordable rate for up to three in his comfortable five bedroom row home dedicated to all facets of the silver process, set in the heart of the Lehigh Valley. An environment rich in history, culture and natural beauty, offering a state of the art facility ideally suited for serious artistic endeavors with silver.

To learn more, contact David Haas at:

Carbon Transfer Printing – How It’s Done

Over the years I’ve been asked how I make my carbon prints. The key to carbon printing is patience! There are many steps one must do before you even make a print. It take a lot of time to understand the variables in play with this process and finding the “balance” as I like to call it is the key to success. I have developed my techniques over the years to allow me to print almost any negative. Once you understand how to use the controls it is amazing what you can do. I teach this process at my home studio in Vancouver Washington. When we get the Covid monster under control I hope to continue teaching as it gives me great joy to pass along what I know to others. The following is just a bit of what you need to do.

Trying to simplify this complex process is not easy but I will try. First one must have a negative to print in contact with a pigmented gelatin substrate. Mine are 8×10, 8×20, 11×14 and 14×17 negatives.

I manufacture what is called tissue” which is a substrate coated with a pigmented gelatin. This process takes an entire day. Once dry, generally 4-5 days of curing is needed, the pigmented tissue is coated with a light sensitive liquid, Ammonium Dichromate. This is allowed to dry for 3 hours.

A negative is placed in contact with the pigmented tissue and exposed to ultra violet light. I use a graphic arts plate burner. The negative is then separated from the tissue and the tissue is brought into contact with a final support medium under water in a cold-water transfer bath. This sandwich is then squeegeed together on glass then covered and weighted and allowed to mate” for a half of an hour.

Developing the image is done in a tray of warm water. Once the tissue is softened it is removed from the final support and the image is developed in the warm water to completion.

Each handmade print is unique unto itself and no two are identical. Some may exhibit a beautiful “relief” visible texture and some a subtle relief. Many variables come into play and some of them can cause failure. Still carbon transfer prints are considered to be some of the finest and most archival prints any collector can own. It is considered the Process of Royalty.”

Jim Fitzgerald

My Journey to Carbon Transfer Printing

So how does one decide to go back to 1864 and learn an obscure (at the time) hand made printing process that so few photographers practice?

I have always been a person who is curious. As a large and ultra large format photographer and camera builder (that is a whole story in itself) I decided that contact printing was the way to go for my work. I printed silver gelatin and silver chloride with Azo for years and when I built my first camera, my 8×20, my friends said I was now a Platinum printer! Hell I had two of my sons at the finest universities in California. Stanford and USC are not cheap and there was no way in hell I had money left to by “noble metals.”

I was reading some posts on the large format forum, image posts I think, and I happened on an image that just floored me. It was a carbon transfer print. Knowing that Google is your friend I found everything I could read about the process. It wasn’t until I met Vaughn Hutchins, the one who posted the image, that my life changed forever.

I sent a message to Vaughn and told him I’d love to see a carbon print. He was in a show in Yosemite called “The Yosemite Renaissance” and we decided to meet. I will never forget sitting on the steps of the Ansel Adams gallery next to Vaughn as he showed me print after print. I was speechless.  I think he asked if I was okay? I told him that the images he showed me were the type of images I had seen in my mind for a long long time. It was how I had to present my work. At that moment, my life was changed. I was a carbon printer. That was thirteen years ago and I have done nothing but print carbon ever since.

I owe a lot to my good friend Vaughn Hutchins for his inspiration, friendship and love of traditional carbon printing from our film negatives.

I now co-instruct the carbon workshop with Vaughn at the Ansel Adams Gallery through their workshop programs. I have come full circle and I am fortunate to have found my true voice for my work through carbon printing. The process is not for the faint at heart, for it is very time consuming but so so rewarding. My journey is still evolving and it is so much fun!

Jim Fitzgerald